Category Archives: Uncategorized

How to install Hypothesis

This tutorial will cover: 

  • How to install Hypothes.is
  • How to annotate the web
  • How to make multimodal annotations
  • How to share your annotations

* instructions/tutorials are from http://jgregorymcverry.com/

How to install Hypothesis

Step One: Go to Hypothes.is.
Step Two: Click on Install Chrome Extension*
Step Three: Accept permission (note menu not visible in image below)

*Firefox extension coming soon

install-extension

Step Four: A New Page will open up. Go to the page
Step Five: Click on Create Account
Step Six: Use a username (pseudonyms allowed –good for student privacy but I would stick with Twitter handle for adult learners)
Step Seven: Add email, and password

 

create-account

Step Eight: Check your email and activate account:

activate

 

How to Annotate the Web

Step One: Choose a text worthy of reading
Step Two: Click on the speech box in the upper right hand corner.
Step Three: Highlight Text
Step Four: Click on Pen

 

turn-on-hypothes-is

Step Five: Add an annotation
Step Six: Click Save

type-your-annotation

 

How to Make Multimodal Annotations

Add an Image

Step One: Find the relevant image. Copy the image url (right click on image>save image url)
Step Two: Highlight text and click on the annotation pen.
Step Three: Copy your image url into the code.
Step Four: Add an image description
Step Five: Add an optional description below. This texts will show allowing the web to be accessible to all.

add-an-image

 

Add a Link:

Step One: Highlight Text:
Step Two: Click on Link:
Step Three: Copy in Link:
Step Four: Type in the the link text

add-a-link

Important the bracket and parentheses must not be deleted.

How to Share Your Annotations

Tag your Annotations

Tagging your annotations lets people find them.

Step One: add the tag (note the “#” sign is not necessary)
Step Two: add a tag if this annotation refers to a specific code book tag (claim, evidence, source)
Step Three: Add an optional classroom tag as assigned by the instructor.

tag-annotation

 

 

 

OLE intro video

 

I am part of the ALT lab team helping to facilitate the ongoing Online Learning Experience (OLE). As part of the OLE we are creating intro videos to demonstrate how you might create a sense of social presence for your students.
I made a couple of decisions in thinking through this process. First I decided to create it using just my iPad (and iOs’ iMovie) to demonstrate that if you have a smartphone or a tablet chances are you can access apps that will allow you to create a quick video just like this. I also decided to create a “picture in picture” effect for several reasons. One because I did not want my face to occupy the entire screen and also because recent research indicates that there are added benefits in making both the course content and the instructor visible.
So as you start to think about creating your own videos what choices are you going to make?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ErVlCz6N1Y

Weekly Highlights (weekly)

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Weekly Highlights (weekly)

  • Neat collection of tools for various uses

    tags:3rdspace

  • tags:3rdspace

  • tags:3rdspace

    • Consumers have grown weary of novelty. People crave meaning in their products and humanness in their interactions. From unnecessarily curved screens, to cups that tell you what you know you just poured into them, we interaction designers are as culpable as anyone in the marketing chain in proposing solutions in search of problems. And admitting that we have a problem is just the first step: The future of interaction design will be about making it human (again).
  • One of the weirdest, coolest, most hyped multiplayer games in years is here, and it started with a tweet:”Contemplating building a game entirely with friends on twitter/fb. Totally open and ‘Mad Lib’ style. Could be fun or totally awful.”The tweet, posted by Mike Mika a little more than a year ago, was followed by another. It showed a crude red box among white and gray platforms.”Where to go with this?” it read. “I’ve started a new project, it draws a red box. Thinking platformer. #helpmedev.””

    tags:3rdspace

    • One of the weirdest, coolest, most hyped multiplayer games in years is here, and it started with a tweet:

       

      “Contemplating building a game entirely with friends on twitter/fb. Totally open and ‘Mad Lib’ style. Could be fun or totally awful.”

       

      The tweet, posted by Mike Mika a little more than a year ago, was followed by another. It showed a crude red box among white and gray platforms.

       

      “Where to go with this?” it read. “I’ve started a new project, it draws a red box. Thinking platformer. #helpmedev.”

  • “Marcus DeSieno very well may have grown up a germaphobe, but you’d never know. The photographer works in the medium of germs, and to beautiful effect. In Cosmos, his most recent series, DeSieno uses bacteria harvested from the most unseemly places—subway poles, toilets, iPhone screens—to turn cosmic images taken from the Hubble into abstract blurs of color and shape.”

    tags:3rdspace

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Weekly Highlights (weekly)

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Video Games and Learning

“Humans learn from experience, but this does not mean they learn just by having experiences.
The human mind learns through well-designed experiences”

James Paul Gee describes video games as a set of problems that must be solved in order to win. The difference here is that these problems are presented in many instances in an environment designed to motivate and immerse/engage the learner in the experience.

Two games I have played recently: The Last of US and Shadow of Mordor have really strong narratives that have made me think about the way in which players learn the mechanics of various games in order to successfully complete it. In The Last of Us for instance the player is thrust right into the story without being necessarily being told what to do. Through trial and error and some occasional hints you figure out various gameplay mechanics. From an educational perspective its a very constructivist approach to learning; players are allowed to explore with enough scaffolding provided through other characters within the game or on screen hints that nudge the player in the right direction. In Shadow of Mordor the choices players makes determines how the game plays out. Its built in such a way that each different player is likely to have a completely unique experience from anyone else. The interesting thing about this to me is the manner in which skills are taught without disengaging from the experience. A lot of older video games usually came packaged with manuals or a training module/stage where the player would learn particular skills and try them out before playing the actual game.  I much prefer the more recent  approach which lets you learn while actually progressing through the story.
Recently a colleague and I had a conversation about different web resources that are available to learn CSS and HTML and the general consensus was that we both preferred resources that intertwined learning with the actual building of something. I think this is what some games are doing really well right now. By immersing players in the the story in such a way that the learning and acquisition of skill happens seamlessly as the player progresses through the story.  I read an article a while back describing how Minecraft players were learning to program through play. What is especially interesting is the fact that teachers were taking advantage of the immersive nature of the game to teach learners various programming skills. Another game Elegy for a Dead World, requires players to write poetry while exploring various planets and civilizations. The completion of each stage layers can publish and share their work with other players.
Nicholas Trepanier at the University of Mississippi teaches a course  which requires students to play a few historically themed video games like Assassins Creed and Total War while they read academic articles related to the period or topic that is central to the game. In this class the articles and students experiences in the video game serve as the foundation for discussions/debates about history. Really cool stuff!

So for the future I’m excited to see what games are available and how educators take these existing games and use them to provide rich and engaging learning experiences for students.

 

New Year, New Things to learn

This year one of the things I have decided to do is to learn more HTML and CSS. I have been exploring resources and websites that actually let you build something as you’re learning.
Codeacademy is a great resource that actually allows users to learn through building of projects of varying difficulty.

One other similar resource I have started to use is General Assembly : the premise is simple enough by building 3 websites, starting from a basic site to a more complex site you learn HTML and CSS.

dash image

Another resource is one I came across on twitter is Jennifer Dewalt’s 180 websites in 180 days.  Basically she taught herself to code by building a website every day. With each website increasing in complexity. Inspired by this idea twitter user @52weeksofcode is building a new project every week in 2015. I plan to follow along with this project and also The nice thing about all of this is that @52weeksofcode will be providing his code on github for anyone else to access and use. So it should be another useful resource for me.

So will I build a website a day for the next year? I am not sure but I plan to learn as much as I can to be better placed to understand how some of the magic on the web happens